“HATE: The Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism in France (and What It Means for Us),” by Marc Weitzmann

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 320 pages. Hardcover $26.00.
This time­ly and high­ly sophis­ti­cat­ed study by a well-respect­ed French jour­nal­ist pro­vides new insight into the upsurge of anti­semitism in France. Some of the events dis­cussed will be famil­iar to read­ers because of their cov­er­age by the inter­na­tion­al media; many prob­a­bly will not. The var­i­ous roots of the cri­sis are explored and at once shown to be dis­tinc­tive and yet interwoven. 

Weitzmann’s vivid, prob­ing analy­sis rocks back and forth between the more obvi­ous strands and the cul­tur­al­ly com­plex. He explains why the explo­sion of anti­semitism in France should have been pre­dictable and why it nonethe­less, over decades, con­tin­ued to sur­prise. It has been a phe­nom­e­non under­stood in a vari­ety of ways accord­ing to one’s social, polit­i­cal, reli­gious, or cul­tur­al ori­en­ta­tion. He sug­gests that anti­semitism has been rip­ping this nation apart, and it is like­ly to be trans­plant­ed across Europe and beyond. The basic premise includes the dis­ap­pear­ance of the French colo­nial empire; the migra­tion of pop­u­la­tions from the for­mer empire’s colonies (Alge­ria in par­tic­u­lar) to France; and the con­di­tions of life for these immigrants.

Marc Weitzmann

The sto­ry of the Maghreb (North or North­west African) region of Mus­lim Arab pop­u­la­tions and their inter­ac­tion with west­ern cul­ture — and to some extent Soviet/​Russian cul­ture — fea­ture promi­nent­ly. As does the sto­ry of gov­ern­men­tal mis­takes; cyn­i­cal polit­i­cal manip­u­la­tion; scape­goat­ing; and the rapid-fire accel­er­a­tion of per­ceived insults into mur­der­ous revenge in which nobody wins for long and blame, quite improb­a­bly in most cas­es, finds its way to the Jews time and time again. . . .

To read the entire review, as it appears on the Jewish Book Council website, click here:  Hate: The Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism in France

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