A towering achievement in the techno-thriller genre with a grim political vision

Tower Down, by David Hagberg. Forge. 320 pages.  Hardcover $25.99.

Book 21 in the Kirk McGarvey novel series is, among other things, a story about super-luxury real estate, the investment strategies of the super-rich, and the enormous vanity and sense of privilege that infects those who have virtually unlimited wealth. These are people whose goal is to invest their money in whatever will bring them more money. They interact with one another in a closed world, vying for seats at the parties where you meet those who can get you on the lists for the upcoming super-deals. 

Mr. Hagberg brings us a post 9/11 world in which the same American longing for the monumental that motivated radical Islam’s destruction of U.S.  symbols of superiority (exceptionalism?) is about to be repeated.

Manhattan is dotted with “pencil towers,” enormously high, narrow buildings whose huge residential compartments demand enormous prices and whose owners are literally and figuratively on top of the world. Vulnerable to winds, the towers are kept in balance by colossal counterweights – “tuned mass dampers” – that adjust to the force of the winds that would otherwise lead to the towers’ collapse.

The main developer of these towers, like his engineers and buyers, is susceptible to the technological vanity that has proven misguided in the past.

A freelance madman, code-named Al-Nassr, “the Eagle,” masterminds the collapse of one of these towers at 87th Street. Fortunately, few of the units had been sold and occupied. Still, hundreds of people are killed both inside and outside of the building. It was 9/11 revisited without the need for airplanes.

Hagberg

Or it would be if a twin tower were to be brought down. And that second step is in the works.  The target tower would collapse onto the United Nations complex. Great symbolism, eh?

Series hero Kirk McGarvey, a former CIA director (and assassin), is once again engaged to discover the details of the plot and undermine it. His theory, shared by just about no one, is that the Saudis (or perhaps one Saudi) is behind it. The purpose of the destruction is to have another attack on the U.S.  that can readily be blamed on ISIS, the main threat to Saudi Arabia’s stability. By this ruse, the Saudi schemers hope to motivate the U.S. to vastly increase its military operations against ISIS.

McGarvey’s (“Mac’s”) view is shared only by two people: his beautiful CIA operative love interest – Pete Boylan –  and Otto Rencke, a good friend who is an unusual techno-genius. . . .

To read the entire review, as it appears in the June 28, 2017 Fort Myers Florida Weekly and the June 29 Naples, Bonita Springs, Punta Gorda / Port Charlotte, and Palm Beach editions, click here: Florida Weekly – Tower Down

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