Debut novel explores how low a man can go and still right himself

Beachhead, by Jeffery Hess. Down and Out Books. 322 pages. Trade paperback $16.95.

In the time-honored tradition of Florida Noir, this new title is more grit than polish. And, by the way, that’s a good thing. We meet the main character, Scotland Ross, trying to escape from hard times and avoid doing hard time. He is a man with moral awareness, but also with a conflict of honorable and dishonorable loyalties. A series of bad choices has made it difficult for him to turn his life around. Scotland’s parole officer is worried about him, and with good reason.  BeachheadCover

His older sister Dana, to whom he owes a lot going back to their childhood days, has married poorly and is in a big financial bind. Though he needs cash to build a new life for himself, she flaunts her desperation to the point that he gives her what he has and takes dangerous employment to enable her husband’s irresponsibility – or is it just hard luck?

Scotland, a superb physical specimen, finds himself working for the man who would be governor of Florida. Allan Kinsey is a ruthless, all-purpose criminal. Drugs and real estate coexist in his growing empire. How he will make the transition from gangster to governor is clear enough in his own mind: buying influence and subservience with the currency of money, promises, and threats. For some readers, the Kinsey character may seem unrealistic; others will be reminded of a certain presidential candidate who interprets an opinion not his own as a hurtful threat that must be put down.

Hess

Hess

Working for Kinsey is already a violation of Scotland’s parole, but Scotland rationalizes his choice while hoping to find his way out of Kinsey’s snare. When he disappears, attempting to start a new life in an idealized Daytona Beach, he is tracked down by a pair of Kinsey’s henchmen. In a gloriously violent scene, he makes his escape from being captive on a boat.

Mr. Hess is masterful at portraying the criminal types, their outlook on the world, and the peculiar ways in which they justify their actions. Kinsey’s main assistant, a man named Platinum, is an intelligent psychopath, and the twin bookends who almost murdered Scotland are just as crazy but not quite so bright. . . .

To read the entire review, as it appears in the July 20, 2016 Fort Myers Florida Weekly and the July 21 Naples, Bonita Springs, and Punta Gorda / Port Charlotte editions, click here: Florida Weekly – Beachhead

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